Home > Cars & Transportation > Maintenance & Repairs > When I downshift and rev match does it increase clutch wear?

When I downshift and rev match does it increase clutch wear?

I was wondering when I completely press down the clutch and give the car gas, an I doing any wear to it. I’m pretty sure I’m not but just want to make sure

  • Best Answer

    Anytime you use the clutch it wears some amount. Raising the engine rpm to downshift will decrease the wear on the clutch disc material and the springs in the disc. The lurch you describe will increase wear on both items. If the clutch has excellent grip it won't wear much material on downshift but the shock of the sudden engagement that forces the engine to speed up quickly must be absorded by many parts. So your blip of the throttle decreases that wear for sure.

    Most disc material wear is when people rev the engine and slowly release the clutch. The least wear is when you spend the least time with your foot on the clutch. So in your downshift situation or regular driving a fast foot is key to long life. 

    not
    Lv 7 1 month ago 0 2
  • Other Answer
  • Anytime you use the clutch it wears some amount. Raising the engine rpm to downshift will decrease the wear on the clutch disc material and the springs in the disc. The lurch you describe will increase wear on both items. If the clutch has excellent grip it won't wear much material on downshift but the shock of the sudden engagement that forces the engine to speed up quickly must be absorded by many parts. So your blip of the throttle decreases that wear for sure.

    Most disc material wear is when people rev the engine and slowly release the clutch. The least wear is when you spend the least time with your foot on the clutch. So in your downshift situation or regular driving a fast foot is key to long life. 

    not 1 month ago 0 2
  • Your question is rough and misleading. 

    Your "Update" tells what you really want to know. 

    Various terms are used for various things, but sometimes make little sense. 

    "Rev match" makes sense, but your question doesn't, the way you ask it. 

    If you downshift and "rev match" it would DECREASE clutch wear.  So why would you ask oppositely? 

    The "lurch" you speak of would make higher wear, compared to no lurch, making lower wear. 

    It's the same when engaging the clutch from a standstill.  The higher you rev, the more clutch wear.  Engage the clutch at an engine idle and the wear will be minimized/reduced. In the big picture, fuel consumption will be minimized/reduced too. 

    Many clutch/shifting questions are related to unnecessary "playing" with the vehicle and transmission.  For best control (and safety), certain things should not be done.  If you are driving a car, and slow to make a turn, downshifting is often necessary, but you don't need to increase the engine speed a lot, otherwise you are shifting into too low of a gear. 

    Driving a heavy truck and going downhill and downshifting has other reasoning. 

    Driving a race car on a track and keeping the engine rpm in a certain part of the engine torque curve has yet other reasoning. 

    I've learned to drive in 1969 with a manual transmission.  I'm still driving one.  Last summer marked half a century of driving a manual transmission.

    -Engine overhaul mechanic and general automotive mechanic since 1972

    M. 1 month ago 2 0
  • I've done that all my driving life. It doesn't damage the clutch, it helps extend the life of the clutch disk and pressure plate, and your brakes.  You will get a little more wear of the throw out bearing, but in over 40 years and over a million miles of driving I've only had one fail before the clutch needed replacing.

    Anonymous 1 month ago 1 2
  • No, when you blip the throttle to match revs for the cars speed in the gear you shifted to, you are reducing clutch wear, it's good practice.  Prolonged revving with the clutch depressed can wear out the throwout bearing, but it doesn't sound like that's what you're doing.

    Trump 304, Hillary 227, suk it 1 month ago 2 0
  • The only time the clutch material sustains wear is when engaging or disengaging the flywheel. That's the only time the flywheel can slide past the clutch plate. 

    Brakes are a lot cheaper than an engine so I'd not downshift except in the winter months in a 4WD on snow or ice to assist in slowing the vehicle without having to touch the brake pedal since all four wheels will slow evenly at the same time. Brakes always depend more on the front wheels to stop any vehicle. On dry pavement or wet warm pavement, brakes will stop the car without using the engine to slow down hence saving wear and tear on tranny gears and engine bearings. 

    CactiJoe 1 month ago 0 1
  • Yeah, it will only last you about 15-20 years.

    The Devil 1 month ago 1 1
  • Just drive your car.  When it is broken, get it fixed.  Engine is wearing every time you start it.

    Anonymous 1 month ago 1 1
  • synchro match a car with synchro transmission? you boy toy racers should take driving lessons from people that have a clue

    Ron 1 month ago 3 1
  • Any time the clutch is in the friction zone while the engine is running there is wear. 

    CB 1 month ago 1 0
  • the clutch wears every time you push it in technically .What sort of racing are you doing ? for a road car with syncros as every manual box has had for the last 40 years at least why would you want to be double clutching unless the syncro on 2nd was worn out and the only way to get it in with out grinding is to double clutch it.  

    arther 1 month ago 0 1