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Home > Education & Reference > Higher Education (University +) > Dismissed from a masters .How can I explain to recruiters that it has nothing to do with my intellect or understanding of accounting/tax?

Dismissed from a masters .How can I explain to recruiters that it has nothing to do with my intellect or understanding of accounting/tax?

Hey guys,

I got 2 bachelor degrees in accounting and management and did part of a masters degree in Accounting w/ a concentration in tax. At first everything went smoothly. I did 6 classes and got bs in all of them.

Then I did a accounting I.T class. I got a C because I did the projects poorly. There were some difficult projects involving excel/data bases. None of this had anything to do with tax or accounting. 

Then I did a financial analysis class. The whole class is based of memos due to the virus outbreak recently. I turned into one memo/analysis but the professor gave me a 70 for various reasons. I don't know anyone in my class so I can't work in a group, plus they are all away.  I feel like I will get a C in this class as well. I've spoken to my adviser and he told me that 2 Cs w/o any As mean that I will likely get dismissed. 

However, I feel that I can understand actual accounting/tax very well. I passed international, corporate, partnership tax, advanced accounting with flying colors. I just have difficulty writing financial analysis memos and doing excel projects. How can I explain to recruiters that it has nothing to do with my intellect or understanding of accounting/tax? Thoughts?

  • Best Answer

    “I decided to work and gain experience, and maybe finish my masters later on.”

    Don’t GIVE them a reason, other than personal preference.

    Laurie
    Lv 7 3 months ago 1 0
  • Other Answer
  • “I decided to work and gain experience, and maybe finish my masters later on.”

    Don’t GIVE them a reason, other than personal preference.

    Laurie 3 months ago 1 0
  • "THEY ONLY REQUIRE THAT YOU HAVE A 3.0 TO STAY IN."

    Lili is right, though. Most of my friends who went through similar graduate programs were -panicked- if they thought their grade in a class might slip to a B. A 3.0 might be the minimum required GPA, but it's far from successful. I was in law school at the time, so I didn't "get it" either, since in law school (at the time) 90% of the class got Bs or lower as a matter of policy (enforced by a strict Bell curve). A friend in CPA school would say "Oh no! I think I might get a B for the class" and I'd say, "come on, it's a B; it's not like you're failing or anything" and they'd say that yes, it pretty much is like failing. 

    "I JUST HAVE DIFFICULTY WRITING FINANCIAL ANALYSIS MEMOS AND DOING EXCEL PROJECTS." 

    Basically what you're saying is: "I'll just be a lousy accountant." Oh sure, you might be able to fill in peoples' tax returns, but to be a CPA you need to understand, analyze, and most importantly be able to communicate with your client. Financial analysis memos and working with Excel is half the job, at least. I was a corporate attorney, and worked with the corporate accountants on a few financial audits. All of the information was produced in Excel, and the accountants had to write reports that could be understood by lawyers and other corporate management.

    That said, you got a couple bad grades in a class that's far from over. Instead of sitting and waiting to be thrown out at the end of the semester, why don't you work your butt off and improve your grades so you at least pass (i.e. get a B)? You need to put in a lot more effort. Whatever work you're doing now, it isn't nearly as time consuming or difficult as what you'll face once you enter the workforce as an accountant. 

    Edit: You're missing the point entirely . Whether you can pass the CPA exam is immaterial (and, I might point out, you haven't done so yet). The issue is whether you can perform as a CPA. I have my doubts. And the number one problem is that, after a couple of low grades, instead of saying to yourself "I'm going to study this stuff until I understand it, ace the rest of the class, and bring my grades up to a passing grade so I can get my Master's degree," you say: "I'll just flunk out and suck at this forever and hope it doesn't matter." 

    "1%(ONE STUDENT IN THE CLASS) MAKES A C TYPICALLY."

    Um, and that's you, right? You're at the very bottom of your class in two classes.

    Stop trying to justify your failure. Get to work. Pass the classes. You can do it if you really work at it; it's your lack of desire to even work at it that's so particularly jarring. 

    Sam Spayed 3 months ago 2 1
  • Speaking as an accountant, my opinion is that you successfully completed your undergraduate studies, and are qualified to start a career in the field.  As suggested by some of the others, I wouldn't even mention any graduate studies to potential employers.  

    To be honest, in accounting getting a Masters right after a Bachelors is often not the best use of time.  Obtaining experience is critical in accounting, much more than an advanced degree.  One of the big problems in the profession is that almost all employers want several years of experience, even for entry level positions.  Once one has 2 years experience, that person becomes much more in marketable in the accounting job market.

    Edited to add: A useful skill in accounting is to become as proficient as possible in Excel.  If you are weak on Excel, practice when you have a chance. 

    John 3 months ago 0 0
  • You don't have to mention it. Recruiters don't want what you have failed , only what you have passed,

    Tavy 3 months ago 2 1
  • Since you won't get a degree anyway, just don't put it on your resume at all.

    martin 3 months ago 1 1
  • Sorry, but your grades simply were not adequate for any sort of graduate degree, and that includes the Bs.  Graduate/professional students are supposed to earn better grades than a slate of straight Bs. I won't even comment on the Cs.

    YOU may think you're great at accounting and tax, but if you were, you should have been performing much better in your graduate-level classes in accounting and tax. Bs do NOT represent "passing with flying colors" -- only As do.  So, I don't see how you can convince recruiters that you really know what you're doing in those areas when they'll be looking at candidates who earned As in accounting and tax and Bs or better in the other classes.  And doing Excel projects is something you REALLY have to know well.

    Lili 3 months ago 2 2
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