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Genealogy

  • How much Dutch am I?

    My grandmothers parents came from the Netherlands to America, so percentage wise how much am I Dutch assuming that they were 100 percent Dutch
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  • The real name of Donald Trump is Donald Shtroumpf ( family coming from Germany )?

    Shtroumpf means smurf in german language
    4 answers
  • How to find which tribe?

    Best answer: The only way is to research your ancestry going back one generation at a time,documenting everything as you do. There is no magic way to find it.

    The tribes will not classify you as Native American unless you belong to a tribe and each tribe has its own criteria as to who will be considered a tribal member.

    You can find records at genealogy libraries, county clerks' offices etc. There is no magical or fast way to do it. As far as websites, never, never,never take anything from a subscriber submitted family tree unless you have verified it with actual records. The trees are submitted by the subscribers and no way do the websites hire people to verify what their subscribers submit as it would be too costly. Even when you see the absolute same information on the same people from many many subscribers that doesn't mean it is accurate as, unfortunately, too many people copy without verifying.
    9 answers
  • When was Benoit Jacob born?

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  • Are surnames of non english origins anglicized in Usa?

    Best answer: Many are, yes....although probably not as commonly as during the "Great Migration" period of the 19th and early-20th Centuries...

    Many immigrants chose to anglicize their names voluntarily in order to "fit in" with mainstream American culture...many others found themselves victim of the informal system that required them to speak their name to a immigration officer, who then wrote their names based on how he heard it.

    This was especially common with Chinese immigrants, where names like Xien, Zhen, Zheng, and Zhiang, were all written down as "Chang" or "Chen" based on how they were heard by immigration officers preparing the paperwork.
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  • How do I find my birth records?

    Cause I want now my birth records were I was born at I want now the time I was born or if I had any medical problems were can I get this information do u still think they still have my information on record
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  • Would it be pointless taking a dna test?

    Best answer: Not necessarily pointless, You might be very surprised at the findings,
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  • Where would I go on-line besides ancestry.com to find old pictures of my ancestors from Alexandria, VA?

    Best answer: Many libraries have photo collections online. Look for the state library or the National archives.
    4 answers
  • 23andMe or ancestrydna which one is better for finding your ethnicities?

    My brother took a 23andMe test and it was for the most part surprising he has more Spanish than we thought I assumed I had more of our German since I have blue eyes and blonde hair
    12 answers
  • What’s all in your ancestry?

    Best answer: family tree type shite?..

    Scottish.
    French.
    Estonian.
    German.
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  • What is a difference between former surname and surname?

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  • Does this make us related?

    So, I know an old classmate and they're my cousin's cousin. Does that make us related? If so, I would find it weird to have liked someone related to me.. ew..
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  • Have you ever researched your family tree and how far back to?

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  • What is my great-grandfather’s female cousin to me?

    Best answer: If they are first cousins, then your shared ancestor is your x3 great grandparents who are their grandparents, so 1st cousins 3 times removed
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  • How common a surname is "Godfrey" in England, Ireland or Scotland? is this a mostly "British" surname or other? where originates?

    Best answer: I can't help you with the frequency. Here's where it originated.

    Godfrey Name Meaning

    1) English: from the Norman personal name Godefrei, Godefroi(s), composed of the Germanic elements god, got ‘god’ + frid(u), fred ‘peace’. See also Jeffrey.

    2) Americanized form of Irish Mac Gothraidh or Ó Gothraidh, patronymics from the Irish equivalent of Godfrey (see 1 above), borrowed from the Vikings.

    3) Americanized form of the French surname Godefroi, of the same origin as 1.

    Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press
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  • How can I find out if my great grandfather was related to the Russian czar?

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  • I’m (southeast) asian and I have double eyelid and long eyelashes. Could it be possible i have unknown European ancestry in the bloodline?

    Best answer: Lots....perhaps even most Southeast Asians have double eyelids though some still have an epacanthic fold along with an almond shape which gives that eastern look. Not even all East Asians have single eyelids, particularly South Chinese, single eyelids are probably more common in northern China, and the Korea's than most other places in the broad region.An ancestry DNA test would confirm any significant % of European or other non fareast ancestry.
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  • If anyone can help me just even give a clue of what religion and background it seems my great grandparents were?

    My grandfather born in 1938, was of Ukrainian (and possibly Russian) background (as we were told) born in Brooklyn New York... His father came from Russia and his mother came from Austria. His father was from Russia born in 1894, along with his parents they spoke Russian. Now his mother born in 1897, came from Austria along with her parents and they spoke Russian as well I think I also saw on one census she was or spoke Slovak. My grandfather last name is Manchur from his father but from his mother her last name was Polanski I did ancestrydna and it shows I’m 33 percent Eastern Europe and Russia: coming from Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania but specifically Eastern Slovakia and Southern Poland. I also have 3 percent Baltic States. Now does it seem I have Jewish, gypsy, or what kind of background? Was she polish, Slovakian? Need help
    9 answers
  • Are surnames of non english origins anglicized in Usa?

    Best answer: Only if the person who has it Anglicizes it.

    When someone gets US citizenship, they are at that point allowed to make their name anything they want to. Some people Anglicize their names. Some people don't.

    Anglicizing names or even just picking Anglican names is most common for East Asians. Very often, someone's name who is like, Kim Lao-un, will pick a name like Joan Kim. Kim is their family name, so they'll leave that, but they'll very often just pick a name that they like that's Anglican. Nobody makes them do that. It's just something that many do.

    You might also find someone from, say, Spain whose name is Juan Martinez changing their name to John Martin, but that's a lot less common because of how common Latino names already are in the United States. Again, if anyone does that at the point that they're made a citizen, it's completely their prerogative.

    At the citizenship induction ceremony, people are asked what they want their name to be on their Naturalization Certificate, and working for Social Security, I've attended a lot of those ceremonies. In a normal courtroom induction of say, 50 people, you'll usually get one or two who change their name, and when they do, they Anglicize it. I've never seen it done where they've changed it to anything that wasn't obviously more Anglican.

    It used to be more common. So you'll find genealogies where the names changed when they came here. That used to be extremely common. When you go through records of Ellis Island, for example, you can find entire pages where people Anglicized their name because they didn't want to be seen as Irish or Polish or German or whatever.

    Speaking of German, after the World Wars, a lot of people of German decent changed their names to Anglican names. This wasn't the United States, but the British Royal Family changed its name and Anglicized it because of World War I, changing their family name from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha to Windsor, which was the name of one of the Royal Family's castles. Similar things happened in the United States because of so much anti-German sentiment because of so many American boys being killed by Germans.

    There's also a custom for historical names to be Anglicized. For example, the explorer credited with discovering the Americas was Italian and named Cristoforo Colombo, but he voyaged under a Spanish flag and so was called Cristóbal Colón, the Spanishized name, but in American history books, he's called Christopher Columbus, the Anglicized name. So if your question is regarding historical figures, know that sometimes they're Anglicized, but sometimes they're not, like Benito Mussolini's name is never Anglicized as Bennett Muslin, even though he's just as Italian as Christopher Columbus.

    Then there's famous people, like Jennifer Lopez. She's left her last name, but chooses an Anglican pronunciation for her name, because her first name in Spanish as said by any Puerto Rican and probably by tons of people she knows personally and within her family is pronounced "YEH-nee-fed," not like the Anglican pronunciation "Jennifer" that she's known by popularly. And, while again this isn't the US, when Prince William went to Chile for a year to build houses, he Spanishized his name, introducing himself as Guillermo, which demonstrates the custom that royals' names change to whatever it is wherever it's being pronounced, which is why we generally say the present monarch of Spain is King Philip and not King Felipe.
    8 answers
  • If both my great grandparents were of Ukrainian background one did they speak Russian and last names weren’t Ukrainian. Pls help?

    My grandfather born in 1938, was of Ukrainian (and possibly Russian) background (as we were told) born in Brooklyn New York... His father came from Russia and his mother came from Austria. His father was from Russia born in 1894, along with his parents they spoke Russian. Now his mother born in 1897, came from Austria along with her parents and they spoke Russian as well I think I also saw on one census she was or spoke Slovak. My grandfather last name is Manchur from his father but from his mother her last name was Polanski I did ancestrydna and it shows I’m 33 percent Eastern Europe and Russia: coming from Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania but specifically Eastern Slovakia and Southern Poland. I also have 3 percent Baltic States. Now does it seem I have Jewish, gypsy, or what kind of background? Was she polish, Slovakian? Need help
    6 answers